What is the significance of Kerala Kasavu Sarees?

The classic Kasav, thought to have originated during the Buddhist era, was made of gold or silver threads.

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Kasavu is a method used in Kerala handlooms. The majority of India has adopted this method of weaving very tiny threads of gold or silver to create border lines and decorations on silk and cotton. The Kasav technique has produced numerous additional fabrics all over India. The Kerala saree originated in the South Indian state of Kerala and is a white or off-white cotton fabric with Kasav borders. To learn more about these sarees, see this article.

Kerala Kasavu Sarees

Worn by men and women, especially during festivals, dances, and special occasions like marriages and piranna naal, the original kasavu was fashioned by hand from fine gold or silver threads to make border lines or motifs on cotton or silk fabrics. The classic Kasav, thought to have originated during the Buddhist era, was made of gold or silver threads, but today the term “Kerala saree” or “Kerala Mundu” is used to refer to conventional white or off-white clothing with a gold or silver coloured border. Kasavu, however, has spread throughout India over time.

The classic mundu-veshti has changed over time, and the most recent iterations also include other colours in the saree in addition to gold to make them appear more lovely. Handlooms are also being replaced by power looms. However, the legacy of the traditional Kasavu is still intact with the beauty of originality.